By Terence Fernandez and Llew-Ann Phang

A notice board calling for objections to a major project on the hill was put up recently. Those opposed to the construction of luxury condominiums and villas have until Aug 12 to voice their objections

KUALA LUMPUR (July 19, 2010): Alarm bells are ringing as the impending development of the last strip of the Kuala Lumpur side of Bukit Gasing seems to have taken its first step.

A notice board calling for objections to a major project on the hill was put up recently. Those opposed to the construction of luxury condominiums and villas have until Aug 12 to voice their objections.

However, what is interesting is that Kuala Lumpur Mayor Datuk Ahmad Fuad Ismail himself was shocked that the notice board was put up without his knowledge.

Moreover, he was dismayed that the YTL Land & Development Bhd mega project plans to increase the density of the area from 20 people per acre to 332 people per acre. “I feel it is too high. I will need to check with my people on the developments of this project,” Ahmad Fuad said when contacted.

He later sent senior officers to the site and is expected to call for a briefing soon.

YTL plans to build two blocks of 26-storey condominiums comprising 408 units and 18 units of 2 1/2-storey villas on the 289-acre area.

Protests over the project began as soon as it was announced in 2008, with residents and groups from both Petaling Jaya and Kuala Lumpur objecting.

Chairman of the Joint Action Committee for Bukit Gasing and Petaling Jaya Residents Associations and Petaling Jaya City councillor Derek Fernandez said the council and the state government are ready to defend the green lung as any development on the Kuala Lumpur side will also affect Petaling Jaya.

“The (Petaling Jaya) mayor and the state will object to this project. It is irresponsible of the developer who is also responsible for the already congested Pantai Hillpark project.

“This is supposed to be the green lung for YTL’s previous development!”

Fernandez said the National Urbanisation Policy stated that all developers must provide two hectares of open space for every 1,000 people.

He said Kuala Lumpur was already a non-sustainable city and allowing this project will further deprive people of open space.

“People in Kuala Lumpur are not being given a minimum standard of public open space so the developer is duty- bound to provide the land back in accordance to legislation,” he added. — theSun

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